Eco-printing with Leaves in a Pomegranate Dye Pot

So many beautiful summer plants and flowers, so many possibilities for botanical printing!  With my coreopsis in full bloom and a surprise gift of smokebush leaves from a Texan friend, I fired up the dye pot (turned on the gas stove) to experiment with a different kind of dye bath.  Usually I use plain water to allow the plants to bring their own beauty to cloth, but this time I used pomegranate powder with a pinch of iron.

First I arranged a sandwich of cotton sheeting, homespun linen scrap, and a couple of small card stocks.  Wrapped in a square, it was clamped and set in the dye pot.

I  also rolled up a couple of copper pipes with various vintage linens and cloth scraps, using a few coreopsis and pink cosmos flowers, along with rose leaves.  I threw in a couple of smokebush leaves for good measure, rolled with cotton string and added to the dye pot.

After boiling for an hour and letting sit overnight on my deck, I unrolled the next morning to find a variety of effects.  I’m already thinking of the fun I will have with my next brew!

Full view coreopsis and rose leaves on cotton sheeting, eco-print clamped
Full view coreopsis and rose leaves on cotton sheeting, eco-print clamped
Smokebush and rose leaves on card stock
Smokebush and rose leaves on card stock
Coreopsis and rose leaf eco-printed on cotton sheeting
Coreopsis and rose leaf eco-printed on cotton sheeting
Wild rose leaves, coreopsis and cosmos on vintage buck towel
Wild rose leaves, coreopsis and cosmos on vintage cotton Huck towel
Eco-printed cotton sheeting in pomegranate and iron bath
Eco-printed cotton sheeting in pomegranate and iron bath
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Author: luvswool and dyestuff

Natural dyer. Chemist. Chicagoan. Felter. Weaver. Embroiderer.

5 thoughts on “Eco-printing with Leaves in a Pomegranate Dye Pot”

  1. Gorgeous! Especially in person. You got some nice prints and even a lot of texture. I’m looking forward to your next experiments.

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  2. These look great in the photos so I know they must look even better close up! Do you have a workroom to do this kind of stuff in? I would be too nervous doing it in the kitchen!

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    1. Karen, Thanks, so glad you like the prints! I am working in my kitchen, which has marvelous long granite counters. All of my dyeing equipment is separate and designated solely for natural dyeing and stored in separate cabinets. All of the counter space gets lined with bubble wrap to cover and protect while dyeing.
      I use separate hand towels, everything separate! BTW, most of what I use in natural dyeing is considered non-toxic!

      Liked by 1 person

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