Project Trois & Hidden Cloth

Although this cloth was completed a few months ago, I totally forgot about posting it here until now.  Yes, this was Project Trois, or the Interstellar Hand. You may remember it was among my WIPS.

In the meantime, I found what I call “hidden cloth.”  Really misplaced cloth.  This was cloth I dyed with Quebracho Red, a natural dye which produces lovely shades of red, raspberry, etc.  My cloth was natural linen–white and natural–which accounts for the mixed shades.

One of the pieces was stitched shibori style before dyeing.  I am glad I finally located these panels as I contemplate stitching another piece.

Shibori dyeing: Kanoko and Arashi with Logwood and Quebracho

Shibori dyeing offers infinite ways to bind, stitch, fold and compress cloth.  Each type of binding and dyeing is meant to attain different patterns with very different results.

I started simply using “kanoko” shibori–in the West we commonly call this “tie-dye.”  Certain sections of the cloth are bound to attain results.  I used natural logwood (purple) dye and bound the cloth with corks and rubber bands.

Then I tried “arashi” shibori, wrapping the cloth on copper pipes with strings.  I used logwood for some and quebracho (red) for others.  I added some Fustic dye for dots or circles on one design.

Rolled silk on copper pipe, quebracho red dye
Rolled silk on copper pipe, quebracho red dye
shibori dyed cotton lawn with quebracho red and “Fustic” dots
shibori dyed cotton lawn with quebracho red and “Fustic” dots
Arashi shibori style rolled cotton, logwood dye
Arashi shibori style rolled cotton, logwood dye

 

Finally–just for fun–I clamped large buttons onto paper and steamed in the same Quebracho red dye pot.  And now I have two moons.

Clamping results with buttons on paper, quebracho red dye
Clamping results with buttons on paper, quebracho red dye
kanoko shibori using corks and logwood dye
kanoko shibori using corks and logwood dye